The acute effects of nicotine on the subjective and behavioural responses to denicotinized tobacco in dependent smokers

The acute effects of nicotine on the subjective and behavioural responses to denicotinized tobacco in dependent smokers

Barrett, Sean P.; Darredeau, Christine

Published Ahead-of-Print

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Abstract

Both nicotine and various non-nicotine smoking factors are believed to contribute to tobacco addiction but their relative roles remain incompletely understood. This study aimed to help clarify these roles by examining acute interactions between nicotine and denicotinized tobacco (DT). During two randomized blinded sessions, the effects of a quick-release 4 mg nicotine lozenge (NL) versus placebo lozenge (PL) on the subjective and behavioural responses to DT were examined in 27 (14 men) dependent, daily smokers. Participants were administered NL or PL for 30 min before receiving one initial DT cigarette. Participants could then earn additional DT cigarette puffs over the following 60 min. Subjective state was assessed using the Questionnaire of Smoking Urges-Brief and visual analogue scales at baseline, postlozenge and postinitial DT cigarette. Relative to PL, NL was associated with increased alertness as well as with reduced levels of DT self-administration (P<0.01). The administration of a single DT cigarette was followed by a reduction in craving under both lozenge conditions (P<0.001), an effect that was significantly greater in women (P<0.01). Moreover, DT administration was associated with increased ratings of ‘pleasant’, ‘satisfied’, ‘stimulated’ and ‘relaxed’, as well as with decreased ratings of ‘anxious’ (P’s<0.01), independent of lozenge condition. The findings suggest that both nicotine and non-nicotine smoking factors may make important contributions towards the addictive properties of tobacco. CONTINUE READING…

(C) 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

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One thought on “The acute effects of nicotine on the subjective and behavioural responses to denicotinized tobacco in dependent smokers”

  1. I just have to put my two cents worth in on this one. I really could’ve saved the government a lot of money that was spent on this “experiment”. All they had to do is ask me.

    Quote: “The findings suggest that both nicotine and non nicotine smoking FACTORS may make important contributions toward the ADDICTIVE properties of tobacco” end quote…

    No shit Sherlock…

    I started smoking at age 15. My Dad worked at Philip Morris and we had FREE cigarettes most of the time.
    I can tell you from my own experience it is NOT JUST THE NICOTINE that causes the addiction to cigarettes.
    It is quite a few things including but not limited to OCD, (I have to be doing something with my hands at all times – hence the number of blogs I have AND the 2 packs of cigarettes per day), STRESS causes the need to “get your mind off of it” and the handling of a cigarette does that also. Also if you are brought up in a smoking household – history tends to repeat itself, and availability are also factors.

    Remember the commercial of the smoking monkey back in the 60’s? I wonder if he “lit up” because he was so stressed out from being in that cage that the cigarette “took his mind off of it” by using his hands to do something else?

    In a sense, we are all in a cage. And they (the government, pharmas, and other merchants) are very good at offering us things to relieve the stress of being in that cage, i.e., tobacco, alcohol, OTC drugs, RX drugs, food, caffiene, etc., etc.,

    Thats my opinion and I’m sticking to it!

    Sheree

    Like

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